Parents reveal how their baby nearly died at birth due to ambulance crisis during Covid pandemic


Furious parents unleash as they recall how they nearly lost their baby boy due to ambulance ‘incompetence’ after he was unexpectedly born at home not moving or breathing

  • Baby Ethan wasn’t moving or breathing when he was born on bathroom floor
  • Triple-0 operator couldn’t tell Alex Moir when the ambulance would arrive
  • Mr Moir drove to hospital with wife Melanie giving CPR to Ethan on the way 
  • Couple have opened up about ordeal to highlight ‘government  incompetence’
  • NSW Ambulance has apologised and launched investigation into the incident  


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A father has recalled how his baby boy almost died during his unexpected arrival at home after no ambulances were immediately available to rush him to hospital. 

Melanie Moir gave birth to her second child Ethan on the bathroom floor of her Sydney home early in the morning of January 2, hours after the ambulance service was inundated with a record 5,120 triple zero calls on New Year’s Day.

With the newborn not breathing or moving, her frantic husband Alex called triple-0 for an ambulance. 

He made the decision to drive his wife and newborn to hospital after the call operator was unable to give an estimated time of arrival for the ambulance.

A midwife herself, Ms Moir gave CPR to Ethan on the short drive to The Royal Hospital for Women in Randwick, where he spent the next week in the neonatal intensive care and has since made a full recovery.

Ethan Moir (pictured) spent a week in neonatal intensive care after he entered the world at home not breathing or moving

Ethan Moir (pictured) spent a week in neonatal intensive care after he entered the world at home not breathing or moving

Ethan Moir (pictured) spent a week in neonatal intensive care after he entered the world at home not breathing or moving

NSW Ambulance has apologised to the family and launched an investigation into the incident.

The Moirs have opened up about their harrowing ordeal by taking aim at the NSW and federal governments over their handling of the Covid-19 pandemic in the last two years.

They acknowledged Ethan’s ordeal is not Covid related but demonstrates the health system isn’t coping due to government ‘incompetence.’

‘You have had two years to bolster health services, to prepare for the worst and expect to be overwhelmed. Two years to prepare before this child ever existed,’ Mr Moir captioned a photo of his tiny son fighting for life in NICU.  

‘Our situation had nothing to do with Covid. If Ethan didn’t survive, his death wouldn’t have made any Covid metrics, but just how many deaths are on your hands outside of this pandemic? 

‘Our son isn’t lucky to have survived his birth, he is lucky to have survived your government. You have failed your people, your country and your own humanity.’

Ethan's parents Melanie and Alex Moir have opened up about their traumatic ordeal to put a spotlight on the 'incompetency' of governments during the pandemic

Ethan's parents Melanie and Alex Moir have opened up about their traumatic ordeal to put a spotlight on the 'incompetency' of governments during the pandemic

Ethan’s parents Melanie and Alex Moir have opened up about their traumatic ordeal to put a spotlight on the ‘incompetency’ of governments during the pandemic

Following Ethan’s admission to NICU, the couple had to wait a terrifying 72 hours before they could hold him again.

Mr Moir feared Ethan may not have survived if his wife wasn’t a midwife.

‘Perhaps it was destiny that she was able to deliver her own child while in the pain of labour and keep him alive en route to hospital,’ he continued.

‘She is a hero like so many mothers, but what if she wasn’t a trained medical professional? What if we were ordinary people reliant on health services? We were told that if we had of waited for an ambulance, our Ethan might have died.’

His wife told the ABC: ‘I felt myself going back and forth between scared mother and my midwife brain switching on.

‘I can only imagine what it would be like if you didn’t have that information and resources to draw on as to what to do in this emergency situation

‘It makes me a little bit scared what other people have to go through.’

Mr Moir had nothing but glowing praise to the midwives, nurses and doctors at The Royal Hospital for Women in Randwick as he paid tribute to frontline health workers copping the the brunt of the increasing health crisis.

‘The hospital staff are the most inspiring individuals I’ve had the privilege of meeting, but everyday we overheard conversations about how they are overworked, under staffed, and undersupplied; how they are forced to take sick leave unpaid, as well as having leave revoked; how everyday they cannot provide the care they want to and are on the verge of breakdown,’ he said.

Melanie Moir (pregnant with son Ethan) resuscitated her newborn son while her husband drove them to the hospital

Melanie Moir (pregnant with son Ethan) resuscitated her newborn son while her husband drove them to the hospital

Melanie Moir (pregnant with son Ethan) resuscitated her newborn son while her husband drove them to the hospital

Daily Mail Australia contacted NSW Health for comment, where a spokesman redirected the request to NSW Ambulance NSW, which has apologised to the family for the distress caused.

 The service has denied Mr Moir’s claims were there were no ambulances available to dispatch at the time of his call.

‘NSW Ambulance is looking into the circumstances surrounding this incident and a review is underway. We will inform the family of the outcome,’ a spokesman told Daily Mail Australia.

The service is currently facing unprecedented demand during the latest Covid crisis and responded to a record 5,120 triple-0 calls for help on New Years Day..

Melanie and Alex Moir had to wait 72 hours before they could hold their newborn son again following his dramatic arrival at home on January 2

Melanie and Alex Moir had to wait 72 hours before they could hold their newborn son again following his dramatic arrival at home on January 2

Melanie and Alex Moir had to wait 72 hours before they could hold their newborn son again following his dramatic arrival at home on January 2

Like other workplaces, NSW Ambulance is also experiencing increased staffing challenges associated with the pandemic, with some workers on furlough and sick leave. 

‘Currently the seven-day rolling average is nearly 4,500 Triple Zero calls every day,’ a spokesman said. 

‘Our Virtual Clinical Care Centre has also been bolstered with 22 clinical support assistants commencing duties facilitating call backs to patients experiencing longer than usual delays. More staff will come on board this month. 

Around 60 graduate paramedics joined NSW Ambulance this month with another 200 graduates due induction in the coming weeks.

NSW Ambulance  responded to a record 5,120 triple-0 calls for help on New Years Day

NSW Ambulance  responded to a record 5,120 triple-0 calls for help on New Years Day

NSW Ambulance  responded to a record 5,120 triple-0 calls for help on New Years Day

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